Author: TheWineMuse.net

Churros

I just had to share that a recipe for churros I posted on Instagram (you can follow me there for more frequent recipes, wine and cocktail goodness at @the_wine_muse) was posted in Zulay Kitchen’s blog. You can check it out here: https://www.zulaykitchen.com/blogs/recipe/churros-recipe In the meantime, here is the recipe:⁣• 1 cup water⁣• 2 tablespoons sugar⁣• 1/2 teaspoon salt⁣• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil⁣• 1 cup all-purpose flour⁣• 2 cups oil (for frying)⁣• 1/2 cup white sugar⁣• 2 tablespoons cinnamon ⁣⁣Directions:⁣1. Combine water, 2 tablespoons sugar, salt, and 2 tablespoons oil in a saucepan and bring to a boil. ⁣⁣2. Remove from heat and add the flour. Mix until combined. Let cool, then spoon the dough into a piping bag.⁣⁣3. Heat 2 cups of oil in a pan. Pipe dough in long strips and fry until golden brown. Flip over and fry the other side. ⁣⁣4. Mix together the sugar and cinnamon. Roll the fried churros in the sugar mixture until coated.⁣⁣5. Enjoy!! ⁣

2019 Left Coast Estate White Pinot Noir and Pinot for the People

I’ve posted about earlier vintages of this wine before and have thoroughly enjoyed its unique qualities. I’ve been fascinated with this version of the Pinot Noir varietal crafted into a white wine and fermented 100% in stainless steel. I’m not sure if I expected typical Pinot Noir notes, but muted or something more pronounced, but that isn’t what this wine is. It is a white wine and drinks like one. In the past, I’ve been delighted by the austerity of the wine. Earlier vintages have been so crisp, so clean, so lovely. And this one is too…but this one has something more. This 2019 vintage is elegant and luxurious. It has gorgeous aromatics and a supple mouthfeel with great acid. It is the lightest straw color in the glass, but greets the drinker with bright aromas of lychee, orange blossom, and pineapple. It tastes of white raspberries, honeysuckle, and honeydew. Delightful! This leads me to one last reminder for 𝐏𝐢𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞, the program which allows 𝐘𝐎𝐔 to name your price for a bottle …

Robert Mondavi Napa Valley Chardonnay 2017

Growing up, I would hear stories from my parents about when they were dating. They reminisced about glorious sun-filled days drinking wine at the Robert Mondavi Winery while eating a picnic of crusty bread, fresh cracked crab, and crumbly aged cheese. It always sounded so romantic, so idyllic, so mouthwatering! When I was finally of age, I convinced my boyfriend at the time that we needed to go to Napa. It was as wonderful as it sounded, and the Robert Mondavi Winery stood as a glorious backdrop to this region with its California Mission style architecture, complete with bell tower. I think of Robert Mondavi Chardonnay as the classic California Chard. With a blend of 80% of the juice aged and fermented in New French Oak for 11 months, while 20% of it was in stainless steel. This is definitely an “oaky Chardonnay,” but it is also refined. Golden in tone, it had aromas of ripe pears and juicy pineapple. It tasted of lemon zest, with clean tropical fruit flavors, and a creamy texture. Paired …

Alto Vineyards Vidal Blanc

In what seems like a lifetime ago, I lived briefly in Central Illinois. Having come from Los Angeles, CA, I was a a bit out of my comfort zone. Then I found out there was a tasting room for Alto Vineyards, an Illinois winery, two miles from my home. Of course, I went as soon as I could.⁣⁣It may have only been two miles, but it seemed worlds away from the town I lived in (video below). When I arrived, there was one other customer, who didn’t stay long. ⁣⁣Left alone with the tasting room manager, she and I spent the better part of two hours chatting about wine and tasting! I was impressed…well, mostly. I’ll admit, the Concord Grape wine (that I refer to as alcoholic grape juice) was not for me, but the other white wines were delicious! Refreshing and beautifully voluptuous, they easily went down with or without food. ⁣⁣Last night I opened the Vidal Blanc and devoured it with a lemon spatchcock chicken. It was perfect with round, tropical fruit notes …

Aja Vineyards Malibu Coast Syrah

Malibu is the epitome of California living. It’s known for gorgeous beaches and coastline stretching as far as the eye can see. It is synonymous with wealth and celebrity-lifestyles. However, only a couple of miles away from the coast, there is a completely different environment. The surf gives way to jagged cut canyons, filled with native flora and fauna. The curvy roads lumber past hiking trails and rustic mom and pop establishments. There are breathtaking views and a beautiful silence. This part of Malibu seems worlds away from the clogged freeways of Los Angeles in spite of its proximity. This part of Malibu is something special. This is where the Malibu AVA (American Viticulture Area) is located with 38 wineries registered under it. This area has hot days and cold nights, usually cooled off by the coastal fog – the perfect recipe for growing grapes. Aja Vineyards is among these wineries. First planted in 2007 with Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon, the vineyard has grown to include Malbec, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc, and most recently, …

Tres Leches Three Ways

I’ll make this brief and get on to the recipes. Since I met my husband, I have thoroughly enjoyed diving in Cuban cuisine – “the food of his people,” as he calls it. Tres Leches has become a staple for celebrations for us. No matter the season, it is decadent, delicious, and delightful. So, here is a video tutorial and three recipes for Tres Leches. Enjoy! The Easy Way: 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 cup white sugar 1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 5 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup whole milk 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk 1 12-ounce can evaporated milk 1 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream 3/4 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F Grease a 9×13 inch baking pan Cream the butter and 1 cup of sugar together until smooth (about 5 minutes) While the butter and sugar are mixing, sift the flour and baking powder together Add eggs and 1 teaspoon vanilla to the butter and sugar, and combine thoroughly …

Featured Wine of the Week – Mumm Rosé Brut

Mumm Rosé Brut – what a delightful way to celebrate! ⁣⁣It has cheerful golden pink bubbles with rich, creamy red berry flavors created in the Méthode Traditionnelle process. I drank this over the weekend to celebrate my anniversary, but there were other reasons to celebrate: a socially distant visit from dear friends and the beginning of life slowly returning to normal as stores and restaurants open once again. ⁣⁣Mumm has been a long-time favorite of mine since visiting their stunning winery in Napa years ago. While their sparkling wines are the main attraction, the fine art gallery at the estate with historical photos of old Hollywood stole my heart. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣

Ice Wine

Let’s talk ice wine. Ice wine is a style of dessert wine where the grapes are harvested when they become frozen on the vine. Since only the water in the grape freezes, the sugars and other components of the fruit become concentrated. This produces a wine with exceptional sweetness and flavor. I’ve heard that winemakers are one part artist, one part mad scientist, and one part gambler. I think this could be even more true for the producers of ice wine. They allow the grapes to hang on the vine longer than typical, usually well after other grapes have been picked. Then, when the grapes freeze, they need to be harvested within a few hours. It’s an extremely risky operation, and whole crops can be lost. That said, the result is lovely when all goes well. The wine is high in acidity and has bright, complex flavors. It’s the perfect digestive and pairs well with an assortment of desserts from cheese to ice cream. This week, I did a side by side tasting of two …

Cline Cellars – 2011 Live Oak Zinfandel

I’m finding this time in quarantine to be a wonderful time to drink those wines I’ve been holding on to. This week I finally opened up a 2011 Cline Cellars Live Oak Zinfandel from Contra Costa County. I love Cline wines and I love what they do. They practice their own sustainable farming they have named “The Green String Method.” With minimal human intervention, they use sheep and goats to clear the weeds from the vineyard and cover crops to feed the soil. They reuse all organic waste and compost it, then introduce it into the vineyard through the drip irrigation system. Volcanic rock is crushed to add minerals to the earth and owls are used for pest control. Furthermore, 100% of the energy used on the farm is solar. These sustainable practices are not only good for the environment, but the wines are also absolutely fantastic! I used to belong to the wine club because I love every one of their wines and their winemaking style. Big, bold, delicious! The 2011 Live Oak Zinfandel …